New Code NLP School

NLPƱϻϼԥ󡦥ΤNLPƱȯԥ󡦥ܥƥå󥯥쥢ˤƽ˥塼NLPθ֥Ǥ

˥塼NLPθ֥Ǥ

˥塼NLP֥ȤϤǤ
http://www.nlp-school.jp/

ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥ

ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥࡧưιǡʣ

Ģ













Each of you reading this sentence has a strategy fortaking the peculiar patterns of black ink on this white page and making meaning out of them for yourself. These sequences of letters, like the othervisualization phenomena just described, are meaningless outside of the sensory experiences from your own personal history that you apply to them. Words, bothwritten and spoken, are simply codes that trigger primary sensory representations in word that we have never seen or heard before will have no meanus. A to us because we have no sensory experience to apply to it. (For afurther discussion of language as secondary experience see Patterns
.)

As you read these words you may, for example, be hearing your own voice inside your head saying the words as your eye reports the visual patterns formed byletters in this sentence. Perhaps you are remembering words that someone else has spoken to you before that sounded similar to those printed here. Perhaps these visual patterns have accessed some feelings of delight or recognition within you. You may have noticed, when you first read the description of theyoung man in the white smock, that you made images of what you were readingyou were using the same representational strategy for making meaning that the young man in our description was using.

The ability to transform printed symbols into internal images, intoauditory representations, into feelings, tastes or smells, allows us to usestrategies for making meaning that are available to each of us as human beings.Certain strategies are highly effective for creating meaning in certaincontexts while others are more effec- tive for other tasks. The strategy oftaking external visual symbols and translating them into internal auditorydialogue would not be appropriate if you were listening to a record, doing therapy or playing football.

This book presents what we call meta-strategies: strategies about strategies. More specifically, this book describes how to elicit, identify, utilize, designand install strategies that allow us to operate within and upon our environment. NLP is an explicit metastrategy designed for you
to shift dimensions of your experience from the class of environmental variables to the class of decision variables and, when appropriate, to assist others to do so. NLP is an explicit meta-strategy bymeans of which you may gain control over portions of your experience which youdesire to control, an explicit meta-strategy for you to use to create choicesthat you presently don't have and to assist others in securing the choices they need or want.

The principles of NLP are equally applicable in assisting business executives to reorganize their priorities and generate new options; in helping scientists and engineers get the most from their research and upgrade their teaching ability; in showing educators new and remarkably effective educational system design principles; in extending to lawyers and judges features of communication that greatly facilitate settlements; in aiding therapists to more effectively and quickly aid their clients. NLP is for people interested in getting things done and enjoying themselves in the process.


An important aspect of NLP is its versatility. Its methods of pattern identification and sequencing may be generalized from individual human beingsto larger order systems, from contexts involving remedial change (problem solving) to those involving evolutionary change (extending the domain ofdecision variables beyond the present state for an individual or system nowfunctioning effectively). NLP may be applied as profitably to the internal organization of a bureaucratic hierarchy as to the representational systems ofan individual. In all cases the formal sequencing and scheduling of activity between the structural components of a system will determine the possible outcomes of that system and the effectiveness of that system in securing those outcomes. 

In an organization, its departments or employees take the place of representational systems within a single human being. Each is responsible for a certain set of inputs, processing and outputs that contribute to one or more other sets of inputs, processing and outputs of the other members of the system and of that system as a whole. By understanding the functional characteristics of the components (employees, departments, sections, divisions, etc.) of an organization and the desired outcomes of that organization, the neurolinguistic programmer can assist in sequencing or resequencing the interactions between components to achieve the desired outcome in the most elegant and effective manner. 




ʸϤɤǤ볧ϡ򤤥ڡ˺ܤäƤ󥯤θͭΥѥФʤȤΤˤ̣ФάäƤޤʸϡۤ¾λвݤƱͤˡŬѤƤʬθĿŪˤδθγǤϰ̣Ϥޤ󡣸դϡ񤫤줿Τä줿Τ⡢䤿ǰ켡ɽñʤ륳ɤǤޤǸȤʹȤʤդϡŬѤŪθʤΤǡ䤿ˤȤäựϤޤ󡣡θȤƤθˤĤƤΤʤˤĤƤϡѥ󭶻)


㤨СʤθդɤȤʤܤʸϤʸˤäƷƤŪѥˤĤơƬǤθդäƤ뵮Ȥʹ⤷ޤ󡣤⤷顢ʤϡ˰ƤΤƱθդï¾οͤʤäȤΤפФ⤷ޤ󡣤⤷顢λХѥϡǴӤǧΤĤδ˥Ƥ뤫⤷ޤ󡣤ʤϡʤǽ򤤥å夿㤤ˤεҤɤȤʤɤǤΤΥ᡼äȤ˵Ť⤷ޤݤʤϡ䤿Ҥμ㤤ˤȤäΤƱ̣뤿ɽάȤäƤΤǤ

 

줿ܥ᡼İɽ̣뤤ϽѴǽϤϡ䤿ʹ֤ȤƤ줾ѤǤ롢̣뤿άѲǽˤƤޤάʸ̮ǰ̣ϽФ뤿˸ŪǤꡢ¾ά¾ΥФƤŪǤʤ쥳ɤİꡢŤ򤷤ꡢå򤷤ꤷƤȤˤϡλŪܥİäѴάŬڤǤϤޤ󡣤ܤϡ䤿᥿άȸƤ֤Τ󶡤ޤʤά˴ؤάǤŪˤϡܤϡ䤿ĶǡƴĶФƯ뤳Ȥǽˤά򡢤ɤΤ褦ƳФꤷѤ߷פƳ뤫ˤĤޤNLPϡʤθĶѿΥ饹ѿΥ饹˼򥷥եȤȤȤˡɬפ˱¾οͤԤȤ뤿߷פ줿Τʥ᥿άǤNLPϡѤ뤳ȤˤäƵȥ뤷˾Ǥ뵮θʬФ륳ȥ뤳ȤǤʤߤäƤʤ¾οͤɬפʤ뤤ϤۤݤΤ뤿˻ѤǤΤʥ᥿άǤ



NLPθ§ϡƱͤˡӥͥδ̤߽ͥФΤٱ礹뤳ȤˤŬѤǤޤʳؼԤ䥨󥸥˥ʬθ椫¤̤ǽϤ夵뤳Ȥ뤳ȤˤŬѤǤޤԤ˿ƺΩäƸŪʶ饷ƥ߷׸򼨤ȤˤŬѤǤޤ۸ΤȽĴ¥ʤ륳ߥ˥򿭤ФȤˤŬѤǤޤԥȤŪĿ®˥饤Ȥ뤳Ȥٱ礹뤳ȤˤŬѤǤޤNLPϡʪλβڤळȤ˴ؿΤͤΤΤΤǤ


NLPνפ¦̤ϡ¿ǤΥѥǧȽդˡϡġοʹ֤絬ϤʽƥˡߺŪѲ褹ˤޤʸ̮ʲŪѲʸĿͤ丽߸Ū˵ǽƤ륷ƥФơߤξĶƷѿΰ礹ˤޤʸ̮˰̲뤳ȤǤޤNLPϡĿͤΥץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥ˴ؤ봱νŪҥ륭ȿФͭפŬѤ뤳ȤǤޤƤξˤơƥι¤ŪǴ֤γưäդȥ塼󥰤ϡΥƥε̤Ȥη̤ݤݤΤΥƥͭꤷޤ


ȿǤϡϽȰͤοʹ֤Υץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥˤʤޤ줾줬Ĥ˴ͿϡڤӽϤΥåȤô뤤¾ΥƥǤȤΥƥΤ˴Ϳ¾¿ϡڤӽϤΥåȤôޤȿιǡʽȰ硢ݡʤɡˤεǽȤ˾ޤ̤򤹤뤳ȤˤꡢNLPԤͤϡǤͥǸŪˡ˾ޤ̤ã뤿ˡǴ֤ߺѤνդϺٱ礹뤳ȤǤޤ

---------------------------------------------------


ѡNeuro-Linguistic Programming Volume
p.17-23


Neuro-Linguistic Programming
Robert Dilts
Meta Pubns
1980-06-01




NLPƱϻϼԥ󡦥ǧ깻
˥塼NLP


ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥࡧưιǡʣ

ͥåȥ













Our representational systems form the structural elementsof our own behavioral models. The behavioral "vocabulary" of humanbeings consists of all the experiential content generated, either internally orfrom external sources, through the sensory channels during our lives. The mapsor models that we use to guide our behavior are developed from the ordering ofthis experience into patterned sequences or "behavioral phrases," soto speak. The formal patterns of these sequences of representations are called strategies in neurolinguistic programming.

The way we sequence representations through our strategies will dictate thesignificance that a particular representation will have in our behavior, justas the sequencing of words in a sentence will determine the meaning ofparticular words. A specific representation in itself is relativelymeaningless. What is important is how that representation functions in thecontext of a strategy in an individual's behavior.

Imagine a young man wearing a white smock, sitting in a comfortable position, sunlight streaming through a high window to his right and behind him. To his left is a red book with silver lettering on its cover. As we look closer, we see him staring at a large white sheet of paper, the pupils of his eyes dilated, his facial muscles slack and unmoving, his shoulder muscles slightly tense while the rest of his body is at rest. His breathing is shallow, high in his chest and regular. Who is this person?

From the description he could be a physicist, visualizing a series of complex mathematical expressions which describe the physical phenomena he wishes to understand. Equally consistent with the above, the young man could be an artist, creating vivid visual fantasies in preparation for executing an oil painting. Or, the man could be a schizophrenic, consumed in a world of inner imagery so completely that he has lost his connection with the outside world.

What links these three men is that each is employing the same representational systemattending to internal visual images. What distinguishes them from one another is how each utilizes his rich inner experience of imagery. The physicist may in a moment look up to a fellow scientist and translate his images into words, communicating through his colleague's auditory system some new pattern he's discovered through his visualizations. The artist may in a moment seize the white sheet of paper and begin to rough in shapes and colors with a brushmany of them drawn directly from his inner imagerytranslating inner experience into external experience. The schizophrenic may continue his internal visual reverie with such complete absorption that the images he creates within will distract him from responding to sensory information arriving from the outside world.

The physicist and the artist differ from the schizophrenic in terms of the function of their visualizations in the context of the sequence of representational syštem activities that affect the outcome of their behavior: in how their visualizations are utilized. The physicist and the artist can choose to attend visually to the world outside or to their own inner visual experience. The process of creating inner visual experience is the same, neurologically, for all three men. A visual representation in itself
like the waterfall or the mold on the bread previously discussedmay serve as a limitation or a resource to human potential depending on how it fits into context and how it is used. The physicist and the artist control the process; the process controls the schizophrenic. For the physicist and the artist, the natural phenomenon of visualization belongs to the class of decision variables; for the schizophrenic it belongs to the class of environmental variables.


䤿Υץ쥻ơʥ롦ƥϡ䤿ȤιưǥιǤޤʹ֤ιưΡָáפϡŪ뤤ϳŪװˤäƻ䤿ǴХ̤ͥ줿ƤθƤ鹽Ƥޤιư򥬥ɤ뤳Ȥ˻ȤϿޤǥϡθ򡢥ѥ󲽤줿patterned sequencesˡäƤߤСֹưθbehavioral phrasesˡפȤƽŤ뤳ȤˤäƳȯޤNLPǤϡɽηŪʥѥϡάפȸƤФޤ

䤿ά̤ɽ¤٤ˡϡʸññΰ̣ꤹΤƱͤˡɽλ䤿ιưˤյꤷޤɽ켫ΤˤỤ̄Ϥޤ󡣽פʤȤϡɽĿͤιưˤάʸ̮ˤƤɤΤ褦˵ǽ뤫Ǥ

㤤ˤ򤤥åȤ失Ŭʾ˺¤ꡢ⤤̤ۤθα¦ȸ˺ǤȤƤκˤϡɽ˶Υ쥿󥰤դ֤ܤޤ˶ŤƤߤȡ礭򤤻򸫤ĤᡢܤƷϹꡢζϴˤǤưζϾĥΤλĤʬϵ©ƤΤޤθƵۤι⤤ȤǹԤäƤꡢ§ŪǤοʪïǤ礦

εҤ顢ϡ򤷤ȻפäƤʪݤ򵭽ҤϢʣʿŪɽв褦ȤƤʪؼԤ⤷ޤƱͤˡμ㤤ˤϡϺȤ䤫ʱθۤ¤ƤݽѲȤ⤷ޤ󡣤뤤ϡˤϡ̤ο̴ˤʤäƳȤΤĤʤ˼ä缺ĴɴԤǤ뤫⤷ޤ

λͤ˴ϢƤ뤳Ȥϡ줾줬Ʊץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥࡢĤޤλв˴ؿƤȤȤǤߤ˶̤ƤΤϡ˭Υ᡼θ򤽤줾줬ɤΤ褦Ѥ뤫ǤʪؼԤϡֻ֤βʳؼԤ򸫾夲Υ᡼դƱνİХƥ𤷤बλвˤäȯĤοѥ뤫⤷ޤ󡣷ݽѲȤϡ¨¤򤤻Ĥǡ¦θ¦θʤ顢֥饷Ƿ俧¿Υ᡼ľ줿ӻž夲Ϥ뤫⤷ޤ缺ĴɴԤϡब¤륤᡼ब¦äƤ봶о˱Τ⤹뤯餤Ƭʤ顢λŪ̴ۤ³뤫⤷ޤ


ʪؼԤȷݽѲȤϡιưη̤˱ƶڤܤץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥγưȤʸ̮contextˤˤвεǽ˴ؤơʤλвɤΤ褦ѤΤȤǡ缺ĴɴԤȰۤʤޤʪؼԤȷݽѲȤϡŪˡ¦˻ä뤫ʬ¦λθ˻ä뤫ǤޤͤˤȤäơ¦λθ¤ץϿгŪƱǤɽ켫Τϡ˵ѥΥӤΤ褦ˡ줬ʸ̮ˤɤΤ褦Ŭ礷ɤΤ褦˻Ȥ뤫ˤäơʹ֤βǽ¤ˤ񸻤ˤʤޤʪؼԤȷݽѲȤϥץ򥳥ȥ뤷Ƥꡢ缺ĴɴԤϥץ˥ȥ뤵ƤޤʪؼԤȷݽѲȤˤȤäơвμݤϡѿǽѿʿѸˡˤΥ饹°Ƥޤ缺ĴɴԤˤȤäơϴĶѿOS󶡤ǡͭǽΰġITѸˡФƳǡͿεưѹ뤿ѤȤߡˤΥ饹°Ƥޤ


Υڡ֥ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥʣˤؤĤŤ


---------------------------------------------------

ѡNeuro-Linguistic Programming Volume
p.17-23


Neuro-Linguistic Programming
Robert Dilts
Meta Pubns
1980-06-01




NLPƱϻϼԥ󡦥ǧ깻
˥塼NLP


ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥࡧưιǡʣ

Ǿ












In NLP, sensory systems have much more functional significance thanis attributed to them by classical models in which the senses are regarded aspassive input mechanisms. The sensory information or distinctions receivedthrough each of these systems initiate and/or modulate, via neuralinterconnections, an individual's behavioral processes and output. Eachperceptual class forms a sensory-motor complex that becomes "response-able" for certain classes of behavior. These sensory-motorcomplexes are called representational systems in NLP.


Each representational system forms a three part network: 1) input, 2)representation/processing and 3) output. The first stage input, involves gathering information andgetting feedback from the environment (both internal and external). Representation/processing includes the mapping ofthe environment and the establishment of behavioral strategies such aslearning, decisionmaking, information storage, etc. Output is the casual transform of the representational mapping process.

"Behavior" in neurolinguistic programming refers to activity withinany representational system complex at any of these stages. The acts of seeing,listening or feeling are behavior. So is "thinking," which, if brokendown to its constituent parts, would incl sensory specific processes likesering in the mind's eye, listening to internal dialogue, having feelings aboutsomething and so on. All output, of course, is behaviorranging frommicro-behavioral outputs such as lateral eye movements, tonal shifts in thevoice and breathing rates to macrobehavioral outputs such as arguing, diseaseand kicking a football.

 

NLPǤϡХƥϡФϼưŪϥᥫ˥ǤȤƤŵŪǥǤߤʤƤ⡢굡ǽŪʽͭƤޤγƥƥ̤Ƽäо϶̤ϡФ³𤷤ơĿͤιưΥץȽϤ򳫻ϤڤӡĴᤷޤ줾γʬϡΥ饹ιư˱ǽˤʤ봶СưʣΤޤδСưʣΤNLPǤϥץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥȸƤӤޤ

 

줾Υץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥϡϡɽ˽ϤΣĤʬͥåȥޤ1ʳǤϤˤϡȳξΡ˴ĶΥեɥХå뤳ȤޤޤޤɽˤϡĶΥޥåԥ󥰤ȡؽջ׷ꡢ¸ȤäưάΩ뤳ȤޤޤޤϤϡɽΥޥåԥ󥰥ץΥ奢ʡʻפʤäФʡѴǤ


NLPˤֹưפȤϡΤ줫ʳˤơ줫Υץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥʣΤǵưؤƤޤ롢ʹ԰٤ϹưǤֻ׹͡ʹͤȤ԰١ˡפ⤽ʹưˤǡϡǤʬ򤵤줿硢ܤǸꡢŪäʹꡢˤĤƴäꤹ褦ʴФζŪʥץޤǤޤƤνϤϹưǤꡢϿʿδ屿ưΥȡѲƵۿȤäߥʹưνϤ顢µեåȥܡΥåȤäޥʹưνϤ˵ڤǤޤ

Υڡ֥ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥסʣˤؤĤŤ

---------------------------------------------------

ѡNeuro-Linguistic Programming Volume
p.17-23


Neuro-Linguistic Programming
Robert Dilts
Meta Pubns
1980-06-01




NLPƱϻϼԥ󡦥ǧ깻
˥塼NLP


ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥࡧưιǡʣ

ӥ












The following except from
Patterns will further assist the reader in understanding the 4-tuple:

"Assuming that you are a reader who at this point in time is sitting comfortably in a quiet place and that you are reading alone, the 4-tuple can beused to represent your present experience of the world as follows:

theprinted words of the book,
the lighting pattern of the room...

the feeling of the chair,
the temperature of the room...



the smell of the room,
the freshness of the air...
 i

The specific 4-tuple which represents the reader's experience where i is thereferntial index of the reader and the blankspace
indicates no experience in that mode.


"In words, the reader's present experience of the world is represented by a description of the visual input from the words, his present kinesthetic sensations and the olfactory sensation available. Since, by our assumption, thereader is in a place where he is presently receiving no auditory input from theexternal world, the value of the variable A, (the auditory tonal portion of hisexperience) is O. The values of the V, K and O variables are specified by adescription of the input from the world that is impinging on the reader at this point in time. Notice that in specifying the 4-tuple for the reader's present experience, we restricted ourselves to representing experience originating inthe world external to the reader. The 4-tuple can also be used to represent the reader's total experiencethat is, his present ongoing experience independently of whether it originates in the world external to the reader or not. We have found it useful in our work to identify the origin of the portion of the experience described in the 4-tuple-that is to distinguish between which portion of the experience represented by the 4-tuple originates in the world external to the person whose experience is represented by the 4-tuple and which portion is generated by the person's own internal processes. One easy way of representing this distinction is by simply attaching a superscript to each component of the 4-tuple-either an i (internally generated) or an e (externally generated). Thus assuming that the reader is reading with internal dialogue at this point in time and using the superscripts which distinguish the internally generated from externally originated components of the 4-tuple, the reader's4-tuple would look like:



the printedwords(e), of the book,
the lighting pattern in the room...

the feeling of(e), the chair,
the temperature of the room...

the tempo and tonal(i), qualities ot the auditory internal dialogue...

the smell of(e), the room,
the freshness of the air...


"As with all the distinctions in the model, this superscript distinction between internally and externally generated experience will be employed onlywhen it is useful for the task for which it is to be used."

 

 

ΥѥȴϡɼԤåץ򤵤򤹤뤳ȤƤǤ礦

 

ʤλŤʾ˿Ϥ褯¤äưͤɤǤɼԤǤȲꤹȡåץϤʤθߤΤηи򼡤Τ褦ɽ뤳Ȥ˻Ȥޤ

 

ܤΰ줿ʸ

ξΥѥ

 

ΰػҤδ

β١

ʶ

 

Τˤ

ο i


ɼԤθɽƤΣåץϡiɼԤλؼɸreferential indexˤǤꡢϤΥ⡼ɤˤĤƤθʤȤ򼨤Ƥޤ

 

СɼԤθߤθϡʸˤŪϡθߤδСѲǽʽδФεҤˤäɽƤޤ䤿βǤϡɼԤϳ¦İŪϤ򲿤ƤʤˤΤǡѿ͡θİФ̡ˤϣǤѿ֡ˡϤͤϡǤɼԤ˺ѤƤϤεҤˤäƵꤵƤޤ䤿ϡɼԤθߤθˤĤƤΣåץꤹȤˡɼԤγ¦ȯƤθɽ褦˼¤ȤդƤåץϡɼԤŪθʤɼԤγͳ褹뤫ɤˤ餺θ߿ʹԷθɽ뤿ˤȤޤ䤿ϡåץǵҤ줿θΰεƱꤹ뤳ȡʤåץˤäɽƤθΤɤʬθåץɽƤͤγ¦ͳ褷ɤʬοȼץˤäƤΤ̤뤳Ȥ䤿λŻΩĤȤȯƤޤζ̤ɽñˡΰĤϡåץΤ줾ǤiͳeʳͳˤξդʸդǤäơɼԤŪäȤȤܤɤǤȲꤷåץιǤͳ褫ͳ褫̤դʸȤȡɼԤΣåץϼΤ褦ˤʤޤ


줿ܤʸ(e)

ξΥѥ

ΰػҤδ(e)
β١


İФŪäΥƥݤȼ(i)

 

Τˤ(e)

ο

 

ΥǥƤζ̤Ʊͤˡθͳ褫ͳ褫ˤĤƤΤξդʸζ̤ϡ줬Ѥ륿ΩĤȤˤΤߺѤޤ

Υڡ֥ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥסʣˤؤĤŤ

---------------------------------------------------

ѡNeuro-Linguistic Programming Volume
p.17-23


Neuro-Linguistic Programming
Robert Dilts
Meta Pubns
1980-06-01




NLPƱϻϼԥ󡦥ǧ깻
˥塼NLP


ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥࡧưιǡʣ

Բ














Representational Systems: The Building Blocks of Behavior


The basic elements from which the patterns of human behavior are formed are the perceptual systems through which the members of the species operate on their environment: vision (sight), audition (hearing), kinesthesis (body sensations) and olfaction/gustation (smell/taste). The neurolinguistic programming model presupposes that all of the distinctions we as human beings are able to make concerning our environment (internal and external) and our behavior can be usefully represented in terms of these systems. These perceptual classes constitute the structural parameters of human knowledge.


We postulate that all of our ongoing experience can usefully be coded as consisting of some combination of these sensory classes. In our previous work (see Patterns II) we have chosen to represent and abbreviate the expression of our ongoing sensory experience as a 4-tuple. The 4-tuple is shown visually as:

e,i֣e,ie,ie,i


Here, the capital letters are abbreviations for the major sensory classes or representational systems that we use to make our models of the world:

A Auditory/Hearing
V  Visual/Sight
K Kinesthetic/Body Sensations
O  Olfactory/Gustatory Smell/Taste

The superscripts "e" and "i" indicate whether the representa- tions are coming from sources external, "e", to us, as when we are looking at, listening to, feeling, smelling or tasting something that is outside of us, or whether they are internally generated, "i as when we are remembering or imagining some image, sound, feel- ing, smell or taste. We can also show the 4-tuple iconically as:


޴












ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥࡧưι

ʹ֤ιưΥѥ󤬷ŪǤγХƥǤꡢ̤ƿthe membersof speciesˤϴĶƯƤޤγХƥȤϡСʻϡˡİСİϡˡưСδСˤ̳С̣ФǤNLPΥǥϡ䤿ΡȳΡ˴Ķȹư˴ؤƻ䤿ʹ֤ԤȤΤǤƤζ̤ϡΥƥñ̤ɽ뤳ȤƤޤγФμϡʹ֤μknowledgeˤι¤Ūѥ᡼Ƥޤ

䤿ϡƤοʹθϡδФμΤĤȤ߹碌ʤΤȤͭפ˥ɤȲꤷƤޤ䤿ΰθʥѥ󭶻ȡˤǤϡʹδθɽ򣴥åץάɽ뤳Ȥ򤷤ƤޤåץϼΤ褦˻Ūɽޤ

e,i֣e,ie,ie,i


Ǥϡʸϡ䤿Υǥ뤿˻ȤäƤפʴФμϥץ쥼󥷥硼ʥ롦ƥάǤ


A
İ

V

K᱿ưСδ
O
̳С̣

դʸΡeפȡiפϡ䤿䤿γ¦ˤΤ򸫤ơʹơơ̤ạ̇̄äƤȤˡɽrepresentationsˤ¦eפΥƤ뤫뤤ϻ䤿̣פФꥤ᡼ꤷƤΤ褦¦iפ鵯äƤ뤫򼨤Ƥޤ䤿ϣåץħʥŪˤΤ褦˼ȤǤޤ

Υڡ֥ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥסʣˤؤĤŤ

---------------------------------------------------

ѡNeuro-Linguistic Programming Volume
p.17-23


Neuro-Linguistic Programming
Robert Dilts
Meta Pubns
1980-06-01



NLPƱϻϼԥ󡦥ǧ깻
˥塼NLP


ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥ

󡦥Τθ

֥ߥ˥ԤθդưФơץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥʸ޴ˤȤäƥݡۤȤϡȤƤŪʤȤǤ

John_Grinder


















NLPƱϻϼԥ󡦥ǧ깻
˥塼NLP


ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥ

󡦥Τθ

ֻ䤿ϡʬȤ޻ȤäƤץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥʸ޴ˤû֤Τ˲٤¾Υץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥʸ޴ˤؤǽޤǤ顢ĿͤФơñ V/A/K ǥʬ򤷤ƤϤޤ󡣡

John_Grinder


















NLPƱϻϼԥ󡦥ǧ깻
˥塼NLP


ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥˤĤ

󡦥Τθ

֥ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥRepresentational SystemˤȤϡǼʬиƤ뤳ȤɤΤ褦˥ʥorganize/ȿۡˤƤ뤫ȤǥǤ

John_Grinder


















NLPƱϻϼԥ󡦥ǧ깻
˥塼NLP


ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥ­

ǭȤäưʪˤȤäơ̳СפȤγХƥϡߤ¸Τˡ̤Ƥޤʹ֤ξϡۤɤǤ⤢ޤ󡣻䤿̳Фˤơ¾ưʪ٤ƿʤʬǤʤȤϳΤǤǤʹ֤ˤȤäơ̳Фϡ¾ΣĤγФȰäƤäȤΨŪγФȤ¸ߤƤޤ

̳ФϡǾλ뾲thalamusˤ̲ᤷޤΤǡ¾ΣĤγФ̲᤹Ǿλ뾲ˤɲоݤˤϤʤޤ̳ФϡͭǥǧΤꡢʪäƤ뤫ȽǤꤹ뤳ȤǡʪΤΥХХˤäȤϢƤγХƥʤΤǤΥƥ̤ơϤγХǡ®Ǿã褦ˡзƤΤϡˤʤäƤ褦˻פޤ


ڥå






NLPƱϻϼԥ󡦥ǧ깻
˥塼NLP


ơ
ˬԿ
  • ߷ס

ǿȥåХå
photo garally
  • ʥ
  • ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥࡧưιǡʣ
  • ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥࡧưιǡʣ
  • ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥࡧưιǡʣ
  • ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥࡧưιǡʣ
  • ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥࡧưιǡʣ
  • ץ쥼ơʥ롦ƥࡧưιǡʣ
  • ˥塼NLPåסǾĶ롣ռĶ
  • ˥塼NLPåסǾĶ롣ռĶ
  • ˥塼NLPåסǾĶ롣ռĶ峫
  • ˥塼NLPåסǾĶ롣ռĶ峫
  • ˥塼NLPåסǾĶ롣ռĶʡ
  • ˥塼NLPåסǾĶ롣ռĶʡ
  • ˥塼NLPåס̤ޥͥȤ
  • ˥塼NLPåס̤ޥͥȤ
  • ˥塼NLPåס̤ޥͥȤ峫
  • ˥塼NLPåס̤ޥͥȤ峫
  • ˥塼NLPåס̤ޥͥȤʡ
  • ˥塼NLPåס̤ޥͥȤʡ
  • ˥塼NLPåסʤҡ顼Ȥνв񤤡
  • ˥塼NLPåסʤҡ顼Ȥνв񤤡
  • ˥塼NLPåסʤҡ顼Ȥνв񤤡峫
  • ˥塼NLPåסʤҡ顼Ȥνв񤤡峫
  • ˥塼NLPåסʤҡ顼Ȥνв񤤡ʡ
  • ˥塼NLPåסʤҡ顼Ȥνв񤤡ʡ
  • ˥塼NLPץ饯ƥʡ
  • ˥塼NLPץ饯ƥʡ
  • NLPץ饯ƥʡ2ΤΤ餻
  • NLPץ饯ƥʡ2ΤΤ餻
  • NLPץ饯ƥʡ2ΤΤ餻
  • NLPץ饯ƥʡ2ΤΤ餻
  • NLPץ饯ƥʡʡ5ΤΤ餻
  • NLPץ饯ƥʡʡ5ΤΤ餻
  • NLPåסǾĶ롣ռĶ
  • NLPåסǾĶ롣ռĶ
  • NLPåסǾĶ롣ռĶ
  • NLPåסǾĶ롣ռĶ峫
  • NLPåסǾĶ롣ռĶ峫
  • NLPåסǾĶ롣ռĶ峫
  • NLPåסǾĶ롣ռĶʡ
Σ̣дϢҡν
Σ̣дϢҡ½
Ǿʳؤ˴ؤ
Ū׹ͤ˴ؤ
QR
QR
LINEɼϿQR
LINEɼϿQR
twitter
  • 饤֥ɥ֥